Workshop, Leysin American School, Leysin, Switzerland - Friday, April 28 and Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 900 to 1530

CHF 150 per participant

Email Paul Magnuson (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) with your registration or for further information.

We agree that learning to learn is the goal. But we struggle to develop systems that consistently promote self-regulation, collaboration, a growth mindset, and the ability to adapt as you go.

Willy Wijnands, a chemistry teacher, has created one very compelling path: eduScrum.

eduScrum and the offshoots of eduScrum are spread across the Netherlands. The Scrum Alliance of Denver, Colorado is supporting additional efforts to introduce the principles of scrum to schools, for example John Miller of Agile Classrooms (California) and Bill Tihen and Paul Magnuson of EDgility at LAS here in Switzerland.

What is Scrum?

Scrum is a way of getting work done, well. It is a mindset that develops individuals who work well in teams, who know the importance of personal relationships, who can deal with complexity, and who learn spirally through iterations. It got its start in the world of software programming but is now found in many companies (e.g. Zalando, Microsoft, IBM) and organizations, including some schools. In this two-and-a-half minute video, the co-founder of Scrum, Jeff Sutherland, speaks about eduScrum.

Participants do not have to adopt eduScrum to benefit from the training. It’s about a mindset, about helping our students be their own best teachers, starting now.

Newsflash

FROM URGENCY TO AGENCY – Sustainability at the Heart of Learning

Sustainability Workshop 26th & 27th November 2021

The UN has called ‘Code Red for Humanity’ in its most recent IPCC report. How do we as educators mitigate the climate anxiety our students may experience (and staff, we might add) and use it as an opportunity to forge local actions? In this workshop we base ourselves on the conviction that schools are capable of, and obligated to, play an important role in mitigating Climate Change.

In our view, schools should reinvent themselves to become learning communities that go beyond preparing for the future; instead they should help shape that future, by allowing students and educators to prototype solutions for today’s challenges. By allowing students to actively engage with the local impacts of Climate Change, they could learn about the SDGs, Systems Thinking, Design Thinking, collaboration, etc - all skills which will serve them well in their further lives. In that way, sustainability can become a core driver of education, very much in line with IBO’s vision about student agency. It will allow for learning to be challenge-based, relevant, local and utterly engaging. It will give students a voice and allow them to make necessary changes in their school environment, at home and beyond.

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